The New Trend In Residential Metal Roof

TIPS FOR CHOOSING THE RIGHT COLOR METAL ROOF

Nowadays, there are far more choices when it comes to choosing a coloured metal roof, but it’s important not to get carried away and choose your favourite colour without properly considering the impact it will have on the overall look of your property.

Consider the quality of the paint finish:

Anything other than a high-quality paint for your metal roof, is not even worth considering, no matter how much money it might save you. It will need to stand up against the elements and continue to look fresh and vibrant for many years to come. Try to choose a paint that has been treated with an acrylic resin since this will help to block ultraviolet rays and prevent it from fading prematurely or peeling and corroding.

What style is your home?

The style of your home will naturally affect the colour of roof that you choose, so think about matching the colour to the exterior elements of your home, and think carefully about the colour of the siding, the doors, windows and even the landscape. For the most unified and aesthetically pleasing look, it’s advisable to select a colour of roof that compliments the colour of your home, rather than starkly contrasting with it. However, if you want to create a look that stands out and is unique, then you can go for a roof that adds a pop of colour to your home.

When looking at colour samples, always view them both during daylight hours and when the sun is going up or down to make sure that you still like the colour when the light is bright or fading. You also have the option of selecting a bare metal roof, such as stainless steel, titanium or copper and zinc to name but a few, which can add a distinctive and elegant aspect to your home.

Think about a dark roof versus a light one:

The shade of colour that you choose for your roof can have a huge impact on the overall look of your home, for example, a light coloured roof will make your home look taller and can enhance it if the property has a low roof or a shallow pitch, while a darker coloured roof can make a tall roof look less dominant or overwhelming

TIPS FOR CHOOSING A GOOD QUALITY, WELL PRICED METAL ROOF

We receive a consistent number of questions that are some variation of, “How do I choose a metal roof,” or, “How do I know what to pay for a metal roof,” or, “Prices for metal roofs are all over the place. How do I decide which one to buy?” Because this kind of question comes up so often, we already have multiple blogs on these topics, including Choosing a Metal Roof: Five Mistakes You MUST Avoid.

What I’d like to add today in response to the most recent question is about metal gauges. Depending on what part of the world your job is located, you’ll find that the local suppliers and contractors tend to what they can obtain easily. This means that terms like “lightweight,” or “heavyweight” tend to mean different things in different areas

For example, you’ll rarely see 29 gauge steel sold in the Northeast or Western United States, but it’s not at all uncommon in the Southeast. For locations in which snow or high winds are expected, it’s just not a choice that an experienced roofer is likely to make. Roofers who specialize in metal in these regions usually use 24 gauge (about 50% more metal than 29 gauge) or maybe 26 gauge if they’re working on a lower-end residential project.

I could write many, many pages of notes on metal gauges and their applications but my advice to shoppers is usually the same: Buy the best (thickest) metal with the best finish you can afford. Metal roofing is just like everything else you’ll shop: the general rule is that you get what you pay for, and there’s usually a good reason that one choice costs more than the next

Tips on Choosing the Right Color for Your Metal Roof

With the right color, metal roofs can significantly increase your home’s curb appeal. The wide range of shades and hues available, however, might make it difficult to choose the best one. Perfect Exteriors of Minnesota, one of the most trusted roofers, shares tips on choosing a color for your roof to help you achieve a beautiful exterior

Consider Energy Efficiency

While it’s not the first thing that comes to mind, the color of your roof actually has an effect on your home’s overall energy efficiency. Lighter colored roofs have better reflective properties than darker ones. A white metal roof is rated by ENERGY STAR® as a cool roof, meaning it can be up to 50 degrees cooler than a dark colored roof.

Base on the Style of Your Home

Metal roofs come in a range of colors and shades to match your home. The color you choose needs to match your home’s overall style. Base your color choices on the elements of your home’s exterior, such as the siding, windows, and landscape. A metal roof can maintain its original color for years, so be sure to choose a color that you will be pleased with for years. Before deciding on a color, look at your color samples during different times of the day to see how they would look on your home.

Metal Roofing – Ultimate Buying Guide

Unbiased, expert advice on how to buy metal roofing, types of metal roofing including standing-seam metal roofing and metal shingles. Includes advice about brands, colors, metal roofing from Lowe’s and Home Depot, hiring a metal roof contractor, and more.

For your home’s roof, you want the most durable, weathertight, fire-resistant, great looking roof you can buy, right? That’s why you should at least consider metal roofing over more conventional materials.

Metal roofs are favored for their fire-resistant qualities, longevity, and speed of installation (in most cases, they are installed by qualified metal roofing contractors. The material is also surprisingly lightweight and great at reflecting heat from the sun, a characteristic that helps homeowners save energy and may even qualify for tax credits.

If you think metal is far too commercial looking for your home, take a closer look below at the variety of products on the market. It’s true that architectural standing-seam roofing panels may have an overly commercial look for some home styles. But many metal roofing materials mimic the appearance of other materials, such as tile roofing. These may look right at home on your house

Metal Roof Materials

When it comes to roofing, the word “metal” covers a lot of territory. Metal roofing is produced from a variety of materials, including steel, aluminum, stainless steel, copper, and zinc alloys. Of course, each one of these has clear differences that affect durability, price, appearance, and more.

Best Tips For Choosing A Metal Roofing Contractor

Metal roofing has a myriad of benefits and this has made them very popular today. The material is amongst the most durable you can find for your roof. It has in fact outshined slates and asphalt shingles. The durability, longevity, energy efficiency, convenient upkeep, resale value, customization flexibility and eco friendliness make them preferred roofing options for many homeowners today.

Choose a local contractor. A reputable local roofing contractor is bound to offer the best services because they know you can easily find them for any complaints. You will also feel at ease, enjoying service warranty from a local contractor

Ensure that the metal roofing contractor has a good reputation with roof installation. It is also very important that you choose a company that has been in service for a long period of time. Reputation and experience can help you choose a reliable metal roofing contractor

Check the quality of materials your contractor uses. Metal roofing calls for quality products and you must ensure that your contractor knows what the best metal roofing materials are. Superior quality products will translate into a metal roofing that lasts a lifetime. Avoid dubious contractors who settle for cheap and poor quality materials to profit themselves in the name of helping you make good selections

Think about the roofing experience in your area. The fact is that different roofing materials suit different climates. For instance, there are metals that are not suited for beach properties because the salt can corrode them. When you choose a contractor with enough experience, installing metal roofing in your region, you can be sure to have the best metals used for the local weather demands.

Using Flat Roof Make Your House Become Beautiful

Different Types of Flat Roof Material Options

01. Various Flat Roof Material Options

We love the flexibility of a flat roof for certain design limitations, but they have a bit of reputation for leaks and repairs.

Of course, flat roofs are not flat but have a very slight roof pitch of between 1/4″ to 1/2″ per foot. Just enough slope to drain water but also flat enough to be a problem if not constructed properly.

The good news is that there are material options for your flat roof beyond traditional hot-mopped built-up roofing that will increase the reliability of the flat roof.

Let’s review the most common categories of flat roof materials available for your home:

  • Single-layer membrane roof
  • Modified bitumen roof
  • Built-up roof (BUR)

Single Layer Membrane Roof

The membrane roof is the latest roofing technology and is also the roof of choice in commercial construction. Known technically as elastomeric or plastomeric roof membrane (depending on the material), single-ply roofs come in a few different varieties including:

  • Neoprene (polychloroprene)
  • EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer)
  • PVC (polyvinyl chloride)
  • Chlorinated polyethylene and chlorosulfonated polyethylene sheets
  • Polymer-modified bitumens

Of all these membrane types EPDM, synthetic rubber is the most common single-ply membrane roof material in both residential and commercial use. So all you need to be able to say to your roof contractor is you want an EPDM rubber roof.

These roofs are installed as thin sheet materials 0.030 (30 mils) to 0.060 inches (60 mils) thick and are applied to the roof in a single layer. Being made of synthetic rubber or polymer, they are flexible and elastic and can handle temperature changes and some impact types better than built-up roofs.

Membrane roofs are attached in a variety of ways. They can be partially loose laid and held down with river rock ballast (requires roof structure to support the weight) or fully adhered to the roof deck. EPDM and Neoprene roof seams are fastened by adhesive and PVC roof seams are heat or solvent welded.

02. Modified Bitumen Roofing

Modified bitumen cap sheet roofing was developed in the 1960s as a replacement technology for BUR, or built-up roofing, by using the proven technology of BUR but also adding polymer reinforced roof wear layers or cap sheets.

These roofs can be installed using any number of techniques which are determined by the project’s specific requirements and material specified. These installation methods include:

  • Hot applied
  • Torch applied
  • Cold applied
  • Self-adhered

The polymer used in the cap sheet provides improved elasticity and flexibility in lower temperatures. The most commonly used polymers are atactic polypropylene (APP) and styrene butadiene styrene (SBS). SBS imparts a rubber-like characteristic to the bitumen.

SBS cap sheets are usually installed using cold adhesives or hot asphalt tar. Thermoplastic APP sheets, on the other hand, are installed using the torch applied method.

03. Built Up Roofing

Going back about 120 years, the grandfather of flat roofs is the built-up roof or BUR. Built-up roofs have solved the low pitch roof problem for ages, a challenge that asphalt shingles could never handle.

Built-up roofs are installed using several layers of a special type of roofing felt that has been asphalt impregnated and embedded in bitumen applied with a hot mop.

The hot-applied asphalt or coal tar pitch blends with the bitumen soaked roof felt and creates a monolithic roof membrane. The roof felt/asphalt tar layering is repeated in overlapping layers until the assembly is two to fours plies in thickness.

A wear surface of finely crushed stone granules is usually applied to the top layer of hot tar to protect the built-up roof assembly from UV light and weather.

Why Do Flat Roofs Exist?

Before we get into comparisons of different flat roofing materials, it’s important to know why they exist in the first place since they’re seemingly such a hassle and an almost-immanent leak threat.

There are two main reasons behind why a contractor would call for a flat roof:

 1 aesthetics

 2 convenience.

For example, when you’re adding on to a home (building an addition) with something like a three-seasons room, a flat roof simply looks nicer. Homes with unblended roof pitches can be an awkward eyesore.

In commercial buildings, flat roofs, outright, offer a more convenient place to install outdoor HVAC units rather than putting them in high-traffic ground areas.

Of course, any roof’s main job is to create a barrier of protection between the building below and the atmosphere above. Therein lies the conundrum associated with flat roofing. For all the aesthetics and convenience, the design doesn’t do a lot to avoid snow and water buildup.

To be fair, flat roofs aren’t completely ‘bubble-level’ flat. They work in much the same way as a gutter system, angled slightly or pitched a couple of degrees, so that water can flow into a downspout. Even so, flat roofing materials need to be able to absorb the brunt of the weather and to withstand ponding water or snow and ice until it melts.

4 Best Flat Roof Materials

  1. PVC Roofing

For many projects, PVC roofing is our preferred choice as the best flat roof material on the market. PVC roofing is somewhat more expensive than other single-ply commercial roofing materials, however it offers a wide range of benefits for the price. First, the reinforced membrane makes PVC roofs resistant to impact damage and the cracking which normally shortens the lifespan of single-ply roofs. PVC roofing is one of the best flat roof materials because it is low maintenance with a long lifespan. At J. Smucker Contracting, we offer a 20-year warranty on new PVC roofing we install. In addition, just like TPO roofing, PVC is a reflective white color which is useful as it dramatically lowers the business’s energy bills.

  • Metal Roofing

A commercial standing seam metal roof is the ideal choice for a building with a roof slope greater than 2 inches. Metal is different from most other commercial roofing material types for a few reasons. Due to the expert installation process and the nature of the material, metal is the most expensive roof type to have installed. However, metal roofing has the longest lifespan, lasting between 20 and 30 years. Metal is an extremely durable material and is immune to cracks that affect single-ply roofs. However, metal roofs can be susceptible to leaks around the seams and roof edges.

  • TPO

This very popular roof type is also among the best flat roof materials to install. Not only is a TPO roof an inexpensive option, it has a decent lifespan between 10 and 20 years. In addition, these white-coat roofs have all of the same energy saving properties as PVC roofs. Plus, they require less maintenance than EPDM roofs, as the seams are heat welded to prevent leaks.

  • Modified Bitumen Roof

When compared to other commercial roofing materials, modified bitumen stands out as the more-budget friendly option. Modified bitumen roofs use an asphalt membrane as the base of the roof itself. This surface is susceptible to cracking and blistering which reduces the typical lifespan to just 10 to 15 years. While the lifespan is less than the more advanced options, the price point alone can make modified bitumen one of the best flat roof materials for some businesses.

Why Are Flat Roofs Less Common For Houses?

Also known as low slope roofs, flat roofs are less common in North American residential construction because the low slope of a flat roof has an increased tendency to collect water rather than shed, like its more steeply pitched alternative. This may make it less ideal for rainy or snowy climates.

Keep in mind, all flat roofs have a slope of between five and 15 degrees to allow water to flow into drain systems (such as eaves, drainage holes or outlets).

  • Flat Roof Drain Types

So, even though flat roofs are ideal for drier landscapes, in climates with heavy precipitation, a properly installed flat roof can be a fine choice for a homeowner – especially thanks to ever-improving waterproof materials and installation techniques.

  • It looks good

Flat roofs are an attractive aesthetic choice that give homes a unique form. If you love the landscape or cityscape around your home, a flat roof can help complement that without obscuring the view.

  • Flat Roof Space Is Usable Space

Unlike a steeply pitched roof, most of the square footage of a flat roof is available for use. This offers the option to add a unique application such as a rooftop patio, garden or green roof. Solar panels also are popular among homeowners and are much easier to install – and hide from view – on a flat roof.

Any of these applications will require certain design considerations (such as adding guardrails and other safety protections and/or using more heavy duty materials to handle roof traffic and weight). Special permits may be required from the local building authority, but these efforts may result in an entirely new feature to enjoy on your home.

  • It Performs And Protects Well

Flat roofs are a cost-effective option for homes – thanks to generations of use in commercial flat roof construction, modern materials and application techniques – as viable, protective and long-lasting alternatives to pitched roof counterparts.

By choosing the proper materials, hiring an experienced professional to build and install the flat roof, and committing to regular inspection and maintenance, homeowners may count on many years of reliable performance when selecting a flat roof solution.

When are Flat Roofs Used?

Flat roofs are often used on structures that are not a standard part of the living area. For example, extensions and garages feature flat roofs, as do outdoor living spaces that have been built in the garden.

One of the main reasons is that flat roofs, which generally feature a pitch of 10° and under, are not as thermally efficient as pitched roofs. This makes them ideal for dry, warmer environments where heat retention is a lot lower.

Planning restrictions in some towns will require flat roofing to be installed. For example, if the use of a pitched roof is deemed to be too high as it may obscure the view of surrounding residents and possibly block out light, a flat roof is likely to be the recommended alternative.

A flat roof is usually the preferred choice for extensions likely to be positioned nearby to an existing structure. There are also instances where a new flat roof is installed to replace an outdated roof system. This is often the case with corrugated tin roofs which are no longer allowed under current UK building regulations.