Tips on Choosing A Good Chiropractor

Questions to Ask About Chiropractic Techniques

are many different chiropractic techniques. Some doctors of chiropractic perform joint manipulation with their hands only, while others use various instruments. Additionally, some chiropractors treat using quick but firm manipulation while others have a lighter touch.

Common hands-on techniques include the following:

Spinal manipulation

This treatment is most typically associated with chiropractic care. A chiropractor uses their hands to perform a quick high-velocity, low-amplitude adjustment of a spinal joint. This adjustment involves enough force to release the joint out of its restricted motion (but within the joint’s anatomical limits) in an effort to improve mobility and reduce pain. This quick manipulation is technically referred to as a “high velocity, low amplitude” thrust (HVLA) and typically causes a popping or cracking sound, called cavitation. Some people enjoy the HVLA form of manipulation and find it therapeutic, whereas other people may find this sound disturbing. Although the procedure itself is not painful, in the presence of inflammation where simply touching the area causes tenderness, some brief discomfort is common.

Spinal mobilization

This technique involves slow and steady movement of the spinal joints through their range of motion—either by using the hands or a device, or stimulation of the spinal joints using an instrument. While this treatment shares the same goals as spinal manipulation, some people may prefer spinal mobilization because it is gentler and does not involve audible popping or cracking sounds. Though gentler in approach, in some cases mobilization may result in a slower recovery and hence, a longer course of care than manipulation.

 

What three things should you be looking for when you are trying to choose a chiropractor?

  1. Choose a chiropractor who you feel comfortable with. Meet with several chiropractors and talk with them at length. You might have to provide a lot of medical history about yourself and ensure that your chiropractor knows about any past injuries. If you do not feel comfortable providing personal information to a certain chiropractor, then meet with a different one. Don’t be afraid to confirm a chiropractor’s qualifications and contact several references.
  2. Location and hours. If you are going to receive regular chiropractic treatments, you may have to attend several times weekly. The times that you attend should be convenient to you, whether you will be going to your appointments before or after work (on the way home or to work) or during a lunch break. Be sure that the office you go with is located such that you can attend at that office conveniently. If you cannot get away from work maybe you can find an office that has some weekend hours that are convenient to you.
  3. Your chiropractor should have some type of treatment plan for your particular issue. Ask them to review the plan with you and discuss your progress as you receive treatments. A good chiropractor will work with your medical doctor if you have a specific issue to ensure that the treatment plan is going to address your specific problems. Your doctor will probably want you to sign some type of legal release before they can speak to your chiropractor, but it is definitely in your best interest to provide that release. Your doctor will be able to provide your chiropractor with any information they need regarding your injury(ies) including x-rays, scan results and any testing that has been done.

 

Chiropractors often give advice on how to avoid future problems by evaluating:

  • Home exercise program. Patient-specific exercises and stretches are often started early in care, usually within the first 3 visits as multiple studies support spinal manipulation with exercise produces the best outcomes or results.3-5
  • Altering detrimental or asymmetric lifestyle habits or implementing various back supports, belts, or pillows to better support the spine may be recommended. Instruction may also be given for ergonomically correct ways to bend, lift, pull, and push.
  • May include analysis of gait, sitting posture, or standing posture. Performing stretches and massages with a foam roller, and exercises with elastic bands may be recommended for home use to help improve posture.
  • The use of specialized shoe insoles and/or a heel lift may help reduce postural imbalance.
  • Tips for eating a healthier diet may reduce pain from chronic inflammation, improve overall wellbeing and boost energy levels.

 

Indications for X-rays in Chiropractic Care

As a general guideline, x-rays are recommended in the chiropractic healthcare setting to3:

  • Diagnose a recent trauma which may have resulted in a fracture at any age; minor trauma in people between ages 50 and 70 years old; and those over age 70 due to the risk of osteoporosis-related fracture.
  • Diagnose spondyloarthritis that may be causing spinal degeneration.
  • Monitor a spinal deformity that might be progressing, such as kyphosis or scoliosis.

An x-ray is indicated if it is likely to help guide the type of treatment recommended for the patient. In any of the above cases, an x-ray would likely provide critical information that will direct treatment protocols and/or referral options for the patient.

 

Contraindications for an X-ray

X-rays are not medically necessary for most chiropractic patients. Specifically, an x-ray should not be performed for any of the following reasons:

  • To identify problems with soft tissues (muscles, tendons, or ligaments) or within the spinal disc itself. X-rays are only effective in identifying pathology with bones and joints, not with soft tissues. An MRI is usually needed to identify soft-tissue problems (for example, a disc or nerve pathology).
  • Purely for exploratory purposes. A qualified health practitioner will typically have a good idea of the cause of the patient’s pain before ordering the x-ray and will use the result to confirm their findings. Similarly, most chiropractors will have a good idea of the specific pathology they are trying to rule out with an x-ray.
  • If there is a possibility that the patient could be pregnant.
  • To monitor how a patient’s spine is responding to treatment.4
  • To evaluate recent onset of back pain (less than 6 weeks duration) without a clear clinical reason.4

Must Know The Best Dermatologist

How To Find a Good Dermatologist

Putting your face into the hands of someone else is an act of faith and trust. Here are some tips on how to find a good dermatologist and laser center. I also give you a link to my own list of great dermatologists all over the country.

The difference between a great doctor (and laser center) and a just-okay one is that a great doctor will get consistently good results a higher percentage of the time. And, if you have a problem or complication

Is there a doctor on site?

This is regulated state-by-state and, believe it or not, some states do not require the Medical Director (that is, the Doctor) of a laser center to be on the premises any more than an hour or two a month. The doctor is the doctor in name only at these clinics. There is almost no physician training, supervision, or quality control for “technicians” to ensure that the lasers are set properly for the patients, that the lasers are maintained properly, that the treatments are done correctly, and that problems are handled promptly and well.

Is the doctor Board-certified in dermatology?

It’s shocking, but there is no law preventing doctors from calling themselves whatever they want. Many centers all over the country are being set up by doctors who have absolutely no medical training in skin but who have decided that they want to cash in on skin services.

Have they been in business more than 5 years?

This is also a key question, because many “skin clinics” and mini-spas fail within the first 3 to 5 years. They may start well initially, with heavy advertising to bring in customers. But they often cannot sustain a high level of results and safety over a broad spectrum of their customer base. So they go out of business, leaving in their wake a trail of lawsuits, unhappy and sometimes scarred patients, and patients who have paid money for services that they never received.

TIPS: WHAT TO LOOK FOR IN A DERMATOLOGIST

Dermatologists diagnose and treat more than 3,000 different diseases and conditions related to the skin, hair, nails, and mucous membranes (the lining inside the eyelids, nose, and mouth).  A dermatologist is specially qualified to treat a variety of conditions including acne, eczema, psoriasis, rashes, rosacea, skin cancer, wrinkles, age spots, and hair loss. People of all ages, from newborns to those over 100 years of age, can often benefit from regularly seeing a skilled dermatologist.

BOARD CERTIFIED

Choose a dermatologist that is board certified by the American Board of Dermatology. While technically any doctor with a medical degree can start a skin care practice, board certified dermatologists meet an additional set of education and experience criteria including

CONSIDER THE NEED FOR SPECIALIZATION

Some board certified dermatologists complete additional education and training in order to specialize in areas like Mohs surgery, dermatopathology, or pediatric dermatology. Such additional fellowship training can be extremely valuable when it comes to properly treating certain conditions. Patients who know they need a specific procedure should concentrate their search on dermatologists with additional fellowship training. Ask any candidate about their history performing the procedure including complications.

BEDSIDE MANNER

All patients deserve a dermatologist that they feel comfortable with. This means finding a dermatologist with a communication style and personality that works with yours. When reading reviews or soliciting referrals form friends ask if visits feel rushed. A good dermatologist will take the time to fully address your concerns and explain all the treatment options.

AFTER HOURS CARE

It’s important for patients to always be able to reach out to their dermatologist after office hours, during evening and on weekends. Many dermatologists will offer on-call or answering services to handle any emergencies like allergic reactions. You should never feel left in the dark on the weekend or after hours on weekdays.

Dermatologist Tips

Do you have any skin care routine for day and night? If so, you’ve probably know how to deal with several skin problems such as acne. However, there are times when you feel your skin is uneven or your pores getting enlarged.

Experienced dermatologist Adarsh Vijay Mudgil explained that skin texture is basically about how smooth your skin feels. Skin with good texture are smooth and soft when you touch it. While a bad skin texture is noticeable.

Exfoliation

Dr. Mudgil stated that exfoliating your skin regularly helps to improve your skin texture. Exfoliate the skin with a soft peeling or a cleanser. Other options is to visit your dermatologist for chemical peeling. If you prefer to exfoliate at home, use a helpful guide to find the best exfoliator for your skin types.

Try laser treatment

“Laser treatment can repairs the skin texture,” said Dr. Mudgil. If you feel that your skin texture has not improved with home treatments, it would be best if you consult your dermatologist to decide what is the best skin care for you

Keep your skin hydrated

A moisturizer can prevent your skin from dryness or excess sebum. When your skin is balanced (hydrated) your skin becomes soft and smooth

Tips to find a Good Dermatologist

The individual could have varicose veins, acne, odd mole, rash as well as other skin problems that you would like enlightenment and cure. However, you don’t be aware of steps on tips on how to actually find a good one. Below are great tips that will help you to find an excellent dermatologist which will understand your woes and give good results and medications to your skin problems.

One thing you have to do is always to ask your household doctor if he can recommend an excellent dermatologist to you. Doctors know the best doctors in different areas, and furthermore, as each of them meet at functions and conventions, he might point you within the right direction.

You may also ask your friends and colleagues once they know anything good dermatologist whom you can rely. Apart from this, you can even try Googling it and locate thousands of possible dermatologists who can meet your requirements. From here, you can check their site and create a few calls

How to Find a Good Dermatologist

Your skin is your largest organ and its health is important to your overall well-being. With so many things that can go awry with your skin, a good dermatologist is invaluable and can make a huge difference in the way you look and feel. So how do you go about choosing the right dermatologist and how do you know what to look for in a dermatologist? Here are some tips for how to find a good dermatologist that is right for you

Check Their Biography

If you’ve found a handful of dermatologists that you’re considering, take a moment to check out their bios (usually posted on their website). Look for board certification specifically from the American Academy of Dermatology

Schedule a Consultation

By scheduling a consultation, you can meet your potential dermatologist and get a feel for his or her mannerisms and abilities while also asking lots of questions about a procedure or issue you’re looking into. You may also be able to meet other patients in the waiting room and ask them about their experience with the dermatologist in question.

Listen to Learn

During your consultation with a prospective dermatologist, focus on listening. The best method is to give a vague reason for your visit and then let them do the talking. Perhaps mention the lines on your face or veins that you wish you didn’t have, but don’t go into detail about the methods you’ve researched on your own. Instead, listen to how the dermatologist would address the issues and their opinion will give you an idea for how aggressive their treatment methods are and what kind of approach they take to treating those issues

Look for Recommendations

Online reviews and recommendations can be a little misleading for some who are looking for unbiased opinions and not just the most positive reviews that a dermatologist has chosen to present on their site. Ask friends, family members, and neighbors for a recommendation for a good dermatologist in your area, or ask your general practitioner for a recommendation for a dermatologist that they like and trust themselves.

Must Know About Take Eye Care For Your Eye

Take Care of Your Eyes Now For Good Vision In Later Life

Is the If you’re in your 20s or 30s, you probably don’t spend much time thinking about your eye health. But this exactly the time you should be acting to preserve your vision. Most vision problems are preventable with simple good-health habits. 

Vision loss is not an inevitable part of getting older. Many studies have shown that exercise and a diet rich in a variety of fruits and vegetables can protect against blinding eye diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma. But you can’t wait until you’re having problems with your vision to start taking care of your health.

The choices you make while you’re healthy can also help prevent certain types of eye cancer, as well as work- and sports-related eye injuries. And regular eye exams can catch problems before it’s too late. The American Academy of Ophthalmology recommends adults under age 40 have a comprehensive medical eye exam every five to 10 years.

Make these seven habits part of your daily life to set yourself up for a lifetime of seeing well:

  • Wear sunglasses (even when it’s cloudy). Long-term exposure to the sun without proper protection can increase the risk of eye disease, including cataract, macular degeneration, growths on the eye, and a rare form of eye cancer. Wear sunglasses that block 99 to 100 percent of both UVA and UVB radiation.
  • Exercise. Regular physical activity can protect you from serious eye diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration and glaucoma.
  • Stop smoking. Smoking increases the risk for eye diseases such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Smoking also raises the risk for cardiovascular diseases which can indirectly influence your eye health. Tobacco smoke, including second-hand smoke, also makes dry eye worse.
  • Protect your eyes at work and at play. Every year, thousands of people in the United States get a serious work-related eye injury or sports-related eye injury. Wearing protective eyewear (safety glasses or goggles) can prevent most of these injuries. To make sure you have the right kind of protective eyewear and you’re using it correctly, talk with your eyecare professional. 
  • Be aware of eye fatigue. If you spend a lot of time at the computer or staring at your phone, you may forget to blink — and that can tire out your eyes. Try using the 20–20–20 rule throughout the day: every 20 minutes, look away from the screens and focus about 20 feet in front of you for 20 seconds. Eye fatigue won’t damage your vision, but if it persists, it can be a sign something else is wrong. You may have dry eye, presbyopia, or spectacles with lenses that are not properly centered.
  • Take proper care of contact lenses. Sleeping, showering and swimming in contact lenses increases your risk for a potentially blinding eye infection. Learn how to properly care for contact lenses.
  • Know your family history. Certain eye diseases can be inherited. If you have a close relative with macular degeneration, you have a 50% chance of developing this condition. A family history of glaucoma increases your glaucoma risk by four to nine times. Talk to family members about their eye conditions. Knowing what vision challenges your family has had can help you and your ophthalmologist evaluate your risk.

Eye Health = Brain Health

Healthy brain function needs healthy eyesight. The brain is our most vital organ, allowing us to live complex lives. Considering that your optic nerve connects your eyes and your brain, a healthy co-dependent relationship is necessary. By keeping your eyes healthy, you keep your brain healthy – improving your overall quality of life!

Good vision contributes to improved athletic ability, better driving skills, improved learning and comprehension and better quality of life.

What to do

Specific vision problems can benefit from specific solutions, according to the AOA:

  • Sensitivity to bright light. Choose sunglasses that block 75% to 90% of visible light. In addition, sunglasses that block 99% to 100% of ultraviolet A and B radiation help protect against cataracts. Choose sunglasses that also block the blue wavelengths. Don’t wear dark glasses at night or indoors. Doing so can make eyes more light sensitive over time.
  • Itchy, burning or red eyes. These symptoms can result from dry eye conditions common after age 50, or from high mucous production in allergy-prone contact lens wearers. Using artificial tears may help with dry eye. Some allergy sufferers can get some help from switching to disposable or daily wear lenses. Contact lens wearers and adults older than 50 with these symptoms should consult an eye care professional for appropriate treatment.
  • Trouble with glare. If nighttime headlight glare is an ongoing problem or if you work in visually demanding situations, ask your eye care professional about antireflection-coated lenses. These can help reduce glare and reflections both day and night. Remember, for older adults, an increased sense of glare may be a symptom of beginning cataracts and a reason to get an eye exam.
  • Reduced vision in aging eyes. In addition to a new eyeglass lens prescription, a helpful measure for older eyes is to place more lamps in the home and install task lighting. Choose high-output fluorescent bulbs to increase light output while decreasing energy usage. Eliminate glare with indirect lighting.
  • Problems with new glasses. If, after a few days of wearing new lenses, you continue to have blurred vision, double vision, or other problems, see your eye care professional. The problem may be solved by an adjustment to either the frame or the prescription.
  • Annoying spots in front of your eyes. Generally, seeing spots or floaters is a common, harmless experience of aging. Seeing flashes, or, in some cases “floaters,” however, may signal something more serious like diabetic retinopathy, carotid artery disease, or early-stage retinal detachment. Call your healthcare professional if you have symptoms.

Foods That Are Good for Your Eyes

Dark, Leafy Greens

Kale, spinach, and collard greens, for example, are rich in both vitamins C and E. They also have the carotenoids lutein and zeaxanthin. These plant-based forms of vitamin A lower your risk of long-term eye diseases, including AMD and cataracts. Most people who eat Western diets don’t get enough of them.

Raw Red Peppers

Bell peppers give you the most vitamin C per calorie. That’s good for the blood vessels in your eyes, and science suggests it could lower your risk of getting cataracts. It’s found in many vegetables and fruits, including bok choy, cauliflower, papayas, and strawberries. Heat will break down vitamin C, so go raw when you can. Brightly colored peppers also pack eye-friendly vitamins A and E.

Salmon

Your retinas need two types of omega-3 fatty acids to work right: DHA and EPA. You can find both in fatty fish, such as salmon, tuna, and trout, as well as other seafood. Omega-3s also seem to protect your eyes from AMD and glaucoma. Low levels of these fatty acids have been linked to dry eyes.

Sweet Potatoes

Orange-colored fruits and vegetables — like sweet potatoes, carrots, cantaloupe, mangos, and apricots — are high in beta-carotene, a form of vitamin A that helps with night vision, your eyes’ ability to adjust to darkness. One sweet potato also has more than half the vitamin C you need in a day and a little vitamin E.

Lean Meat and Poultry

Zinc brings vitamin A from your liver to your retina, where it’s used to make the protective pigment melanin. Oysters have more zinc per serving than any other food, but you don’t have to be a shellfish lover to get enough: Beef, pork, and chicken (both dark and breast meat) are all good sources.

Eggs

It’s a great package deal: The zinc in an egg will help your body use the lutein and zeaxanthin from its yolk. The yellow-orange color of these compounds blocks harmful blue light from damaging your retina. They help boost the amount of protective pigment in the macula, the part of your eye that controls central vision.

THE WORST FOODS FOR YOUR EYE HEALTH

You know the saying, “You are what you eat”? The food you eat plays a huge part in your health.

Our eyes are vascular, meaning that it is important to have a heart-healthy diet to keep the blood vessels that service our eyes healthy. Tiny capillaries provide your retina with nutrients and oxygen; because these vessels are so small, fatty deposits can easily cause blocked veins.

list of the foods that are harmful to the health of your eyes.

CONDIMENTS, TOPPINGS, AND DRESSINGS

The toppings that you likely store in your refrigerator door like mayonnaise, salad dressing, or jelly, are all high in fat.

Rather than using these options for flavor on your next sandwich, burger, or salad, try using natural flavors like green vegetables or toppings that are packed with vitamin C, like a squeeze of fresh lemon. Get great flavor with natural foods without sacrificing your nutritional benefits!

WHITE OR PLAIN COLORED FOODS

Think about the white foods that you eat: pasta, white bread, rice, and flour tortillas. These foods offer almost no nutritional benefit, just simple carbohydrates that give a rush of energy that are followed by a crash.

If you are eating these foods, be sure to add greens and foods that rich with omega-3 to the meal to provide yourself with nutritional benefits. Or, swap them for healthier alternatives that use whole grains.

FATTY MEATS

Red meats and sausages are often convenient to purchase, especially when you are buying from the deli. Lunch meats can seem healthy but are mostly full of chemical preservatives, salt, fat, and cholesterol.

Instead of consuming fatty meats, try adding in lean meats like fresh turkey, which is full of zinc and protein. Salmon is good alternative as well, as it is an omega-3 rich food.

MARGARINE

Margarine is often marketed as a healthy alternative to butter, but is full of trans fats that can adversely affect your cholesterol.

Instead, try using coconut, avocado, or olive oil as an alternative to both margarine and butter to avoid trans fats.

UNSATURATED FATS

Junk foods are delicious but can cause serious issues down the line for your health if you consume too many. Rather than eating French fries, cookies, or potato chips, which are all full of unsaturated fats, swap them out for healthy saturated fats.

Lean meats, fish, fresh fruits and veggies, and low-fat or non-dairy products are the best way to receive healthy fats.